MACV-SOG Long Guns and Handguns

Suppressed UZI

 UZI

The Uzi is a family of Israeli open-bolt, blowback-operated submachine guns. The Uzi was one of the first weapons to use a telescoping bolt design which allows the magazine to be housed in the pistol grip for a shorter weapon.

Gyroject Rocket Pistol

Gyrojet Pistol

The Gyrojet is a family of unique firearms developed in the 1960s named for the method of gyroscopically stabilizing its projectiles. Rather than inert bullets, Gyrojets fire small rockets called Microjets which have little recoil and do not require a heavy barrel or chamber to resist the pressure of the combustion gases. Velocity on leaving the tube was very low, but increased to around 1,250 feet per second at 30 feet. The result is a very lightweight & transportable weapon.

Franklin Douglas “Doug” Miller With a Gyrojet Rocket Pistol

Franklin Douglas "Doug" Miller
AK-47

AK–47

The AK-47, officially known as the Avtomat Kalashnikova, is a gas-operated, 7.62×39mm assault rifle developed in the Soviet Union by Mikhail Kalashnikov in the aftermath of World War II. It is the originating firearm of the Kalashnikov rifle family. The number 47 refers to the year it was finished.

Swedish K

Cochran and Troop at Kontum 1969 Paul Christensen MACVSOG
Cochran and Troop at Kontum 1969 Paul Christensen MACVSOG

Browning Hi-Power

The Browning Hi-Power is a single-action, semi-automatic handgun available in the 9mm and.40 S&W calibers. It was based on a design by American firearms inventor John Browning, and completed by Dieudonné Saive at Fabrique Nationale of Herstal, Belgium. Browning died in 1926, several years before the design was finalized. The Hi-Power is one of the most widely used military pistols in history, having been used by the armed forces of over 50 countries. After 82 years of continuous production, the Hi-Power was discontinued in 2017 by Browning Arms, but it remained in production in some countries, under license.

M60

The M60, officially the Machine Gun, Caliber 7.62 mm, M60, is a family of American general-purpose machine guns firing 7.62×51mm NATO cartridges from a disintegrating belt of M13 links. There are several types of ammunition approved for use in the M60, including ball, tracer, and armor-piercing rounds

M-60

M79 grenade launcher

The M79 grenade launcher is a single-shot, shoulder-fired, break-action grenade launcher that fires a 40×46mm grenade, which uses what the US Army calls the High-Low Propulsion System to keep recoil forces low, and first appeared during the Vietnam War. Because of its distinctive report, it has earned the nicknames of “Thumper”, “Thump-Gun”, “Bloop Tube”, “Big Ed”, “Elephant Gun,” and “Blooper” among American soldiers as well as “Can Cannon” in reference to the grenade size; Australian units referred to it as the “Wombat Gun”. The M79 can fire a wide variety of 40 mm rounds, including explosive, anti-personnel, smoke, buckshot, flechette (pointed steel projectiles with a vaned tail for stable flight), and illumination. While largely replaced by the M203, the M79 has remained in service in many units worldwide in niche roles.

40MM
MACV-SOG Cut Down 40mm

MACV-SOG Cut Down M79

Car 15 & M79
John Meyers with Shorten 40MM with Lynee Black

CAR-15

The Colt Automatic Rifle-15 or CAR-15 was a family of M16 rifle based firearms marketed by Colt in the 1960s and early 1970s. However, the term “CAR-15” is most commonly associated with the Colt Commando (AKA: XM177); these select-fire carbines have ultrashort 10.5-inch (270 mm) and 11.5-inch (290 mm) barrels with over-sized flash suppressors.

The CAR-15 name was an attempt to re-associate the AR-15 name with Colt, since the AR initially stood for ArmaLite, the original manufacturer of the ArmaLite AR-15. Colt later abandoned the CAR-15 concept, but continued to make carbine variations, using the “M16” brand for select-fire models and the “Colt AR-15” brand for semi-automatic models. However, in present usage, “CAR-15” is the generic name for all carbine-length variants made before the M4 carbine.

Colt Car-15
Thompson 45 Cal

Thompson Submachine

The Thompson submachine gun is an American submachine gun first invented by John T. Thompson in 1918 during World War I that became infamous during the Prohibition era, being a signature weapon of various organized crime syndicates in the United States. It was a common sight in the media of the time, being used by both law enforcement officers and criminals. The Thompson submachine gun was also known informally as the “Tommy Gun”, “Street Sweeper”, “Annihilator”, “Chicago Typewriter”, “Trench Broom”, “Chicago Submachine”, “Chicago Piano”, “Chicago Style”, “Chicago Organ Grinder”, “Drum Gun”, “the Chopper”, “the Tommy Boy” or simply “the Thompson”.

.45 caliber M-3 Silenced

.45 caliber M-3 Silenced

Jim firing the .45 caliber M-3 Silenced Grease Gun that they took on missions, which they put together that night, in case the tiger attacked.